Blue piano in streetcar named desire. Symbolism in a Streetcar Named Desire free essay sample 2019-02-17

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Symbolism in a Streetcar Named Desire Essay

blue piano in streetcar named desire

Considering Blanche's deterioration of sanity is ultimately the climax of the play particularly Stanley raping her and the time following the music helps indicate that these events and Blanche as a character are both hugely vital to the story as a whole, and most prominently contribute to the theme or purpose of the play. Stella and Blanche have the same rather wealthy and cultivated background, which is the connection between the two women. She enters unannounced, unmentioned, and we spend the next 90 minutes figuring out just who she is — and we don't really get the answer until the last few scenes of the play. So although Blanche dislikes Stanley as a person, she is drawn to him as a type of man who is resoundingly heterosexual and who is strong enough to protect her from an increasingly harsh world. It is very apparent that the world of Belle Reve and the world in which Stella ives now is extremely different because of the difference in men, their behavior and even the place which seems very inferior when compared with Belle Reve. Williams uses this technique of colour to signify Blanche's inability to fit in with her surroundings.

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A Streetcar Named Desire Men and Masculinity Quotes Page 2

blue piano in streetcar named desire

Therefore her journey can be regarded as the journey of her soul. Stella: He smashed all the light-bulbs with the heel of my slipper! Blanche used to indulge in a rather excessive lifestyle. We first see Eunice in the very first scene of the play. This quality is not identical with the colour symbolism of blue. There is also a great irony in the music that Blanche chooses to sing. Music and New Orleans go together like movies and Hollywood, or rain and Seattle, or angry people walking quickly and New York City.

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“Blue Piano”

blue piano in streetcar named desire

She wants to live a life that pairs with her traditional southern belle personality. One of the main character trait that this music possesses is the sexual tension. According to Roman mythology, Elysium or Elysian Fields was a part of the underworld and a place of reward for the virtuous dead. This is echoed with the woman selling flowers for the dead; Blanche cannot touch them, let alone think of them, as they are symbolic of the end, while the child is the future. This phrase seems like an expressionist painting, it aims to bombard the senses with a many textured canvas. On the other hand, beautiful dream suggests that something beautiful, which has once existed, faded away.

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Symbols in a Streetcar Named Desire

blue piano in streetcar named desire

Blanche: And you — you let him? This again shows her fear of light since for her it represents reality, and in scene nine this becomes even more obvious. Take a look at the lyrics before you write it off. Blues is sexual and dangerous, but it is also an enjoyable pasttime spent with groups of people. So her former life was more like a jungle or a forest, because it was hard to see through all this and detect the real Blanche. This action is almost a reference to Macbeth, where Lady Macbeth repeatedly washes her hands to cleanse her guilt after killing Duncan. Blanche DuBois cannot only be translated as white wood but also as white and made of wood, which makes it easier for the reader to detect that she seems pure and innocent on the outside, but is really quite tough and calculating when it comes down to her image and her future, especially concerning her search for a husband.

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A Streetcar Named Desire Music and Streetcar

blue piano in streetcar named desire

She sees this child as a future, and despite the fact her life is fleeting and hallow, this child can live on. Stella is very much in love with Stanley, and she tells Blanche not to compare him to the boys they knew at Belle Reve. It sets the mood of Blanche being unstable and imagining creepy music that no one else can hear. Only the illusory image which she tries to create for herself suggests these traits, but her true nature is not like that at all. In Tennessee Williams' play, A Streetcar Named Desire, the character of Blanche Dubois is one clear example of the use of symbolism. In most aspects Eunice is actually quite similar to Stella and in fact Eunice is a close representation of what society was like at the time. Blanche thinks of Mitch as a future husband, and therefore she does not want him to know her past or her true age, and the best way to hide her age is to stay out of bright light where he could possibly see her wrinkles and fading youth in her face.

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What mood do the opening stage direction and setting description create? What effect is created with the music of the “blue piano”?

blue piano in streetcar named desire

Therefore all she cares about is to keep that image alive. Sex leads to death for others Blanche knows as well. This style of buildings is typical French; elegant and extravagant. You can follow any responses to this entry through the feed. Williams creates a vast web of emotional conflicts thought all the characters, which… 1702 Words 7 Pages Practice Essay: Emilia Kelly The two texts of Enduring Love and A Streetcar named Desire show privilege of one way of perceiving the world over the other in their conclusions.

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Music in A Streetcar Named Desire by Jacqueline C on Prezi

blue piano in streetcar named desire

She wants a cultured man but is often subconsciously attracted to strong, basic male characters, perhaps a response to her marriage with a cultured, sensitive man which ended in disaster. Bringing the charade too far however, leads to Stanley raping and breaking her, as reflected in lines 5 and 6. Throughout this semester, we were introduced to varying degrees of literary styles and themes. And if that is sinful, then let me be damned for it! The songs Blanche sings reveal her illusions and dreams of youth and desirability. Even though Blanche is horrified at the way Stanley treats Stella, her solution to get out of the situation also relies on a man. In the play itself, music plays a significant role both as a mood setter and as a source of characterization.


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A Streetcar Named Desire Scene 4 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

blue piano in streetcar named desire

One reason for this may be found in the way Williams makes extensive use of symbols as a dramatic technique. The two major characters, Blanche and Stanley, are each dressed in certain coloured clothes to underline their nature. And yet, it is a work that has notably resisted musical adaptation. However to be able to view Stanley sympathetically we need to understand his emotion and mentality, before we make a full judgment on him. She constantly tries to hide her embarrassing past from all of her new acquaintances, because she fears that they might not accept her anymore. I like an artist who paints in strong, bold colours, primary colours. Yet, Blanche does not know how to face these.

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A Streetcar Named Desire Scene 4 Analysis

blue piano in streetcar named desire

The Elysian Fields are the land of the dead in Greek mythology. I personally feel Stanley is a harsh character but I also believe he is pushed into doing such actions and I cannot help feel that if Blanche had not visited none of this would have happened. Both texts explore explore the responses of their protagonists of a crisis… 934 Words 4 Pages A Streetcar Named Desire is a book that occurs in the 1960s, New Orleans where an agrarian southern culture meets the new industrialized southern culture. Thus Williams emphasises the theatre dimension of the symbols he uses, as well as symbolic meanings in dramatic language. Polka Music Whenever the Polka music is evident is almost always evident in scenes that have something to do with Blanches past, and more than often it is when her husband is involved.

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Symbolism in a Streetcar Named Desire Essay

blue piano in streetcar named desire

Stanley pulls the whiskey bottle out to take a drink, noting its depletion. We are told who everyone is as soon as they step on stage, and the story moves forward through action alone. While Blanche only sings the first two lines of the song, it foreshadows the entire plot the audience of the time would have been familiar with the lyrics. Therefore she can be considered to be the stabilising element of the play. It foreshadows the mental decline of Blanche and highlights the events that are seemingly responsible for her slippery slope into madness. He also uses music to set the mood for certain scenes, making music in the play a very important motif. The trumpet and drums have different meanings for different occasions.

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