Chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird. Notes on Chapter 13 from To Kill a Mockingbird 2019-02-09

Chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird Rating: 6,8/10 1732 reviews

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 12

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

Scout is feeling the opposite, like she can't do anything with adults always present. Meanwhile, Dill seems to represent the earlier childhood that Scout reflected on so fondly in the novel. Scout asks if she can go with Calpurnia again, and Aunt Alexandra is outraged. Alexandria would condemn almost any other type of lifestyle and Jem thought it was funny because he thought that one day she would start a fight or something. With the door closed, Jem tells Scout that she needs to watch what she says to Aunt Alexandra.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

Her character serves as the bridge between two worlds, and the reader develops a sense of her double life, which is split between the Finch household and the black community. Jem tries to defend his reasoning for telling an adult, but Scout and Dill won't hear it. As part two of To Kill a Mockingbird begins, Scout and Jem find themselves dealing with adult issues of race, justice, and etiquette. To her surprise, it's Dill. He changes his tone and says, 'Don't you worry about anything. Alexandra even forces Atticus to teach Scout and Jem about their family history.

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To Kill A Mockingbird: Chapter 13 Summary

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

Tension in Maycomb will only continue to grow as the trial date approaches. They attend church with their black maid, Calpurnia, and learn more about the Tom Robinson case than they can fully process. She is still very much living in the innocence of childhood, while Jem is becoming more and more mature. Jem tells Atticus-despite Scout's protest- and Atticus goes next door to tell Dill's aunt, Miss Rachel. He has been unhappy with his life and the lack of attention his parents have been giving him, so he took himself on the train to Maycomb.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

When she turns on the light, there is nothing there. Background Information Scout and Jem find their summer not shaping up the way it has been in the past. One thing leads to another, and Scout tells Atticus about how she went to Church with Calpurnia. In addition, Lee introduces the black community at a crucial moment in the narrativeā€”just as race relations in Maycomb are thrown into crisis by the trial of Tom Robinson. His behavior and his request didn't seem like the Atticus they loved at all.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

She orders Atticus to lecture them on the subject of their ancestry. His lecture upsets Scout even more, and she goes after him. Alexandra moved right in and made herself at home, and soon enough it seemed as if she'd lived there forever. Scout also finds out that it was Bob Ewell who has made the accusations against Tom Robinson. Summary of Chapter 13 Aunt Alexandra notifies them that she has come to stay with them. I don't want you to remember it. Literary Themes Part Two is a turning point for To Kill a Mockingbird in a number of ways.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

Scout Justifies this lie saying that sometimes you must lie when there is nothing you can do about a situation. It takes a woman to do that kind of work. With Dill not returning and their father, Atticus, away at the capitol for a few weeks, they are finding a lot of changes. Atticus breaks up the fight and sends them off to bed. This speech demonstrates the gulf between blacks and whites in Maycomb: not only do class distinctions and bigotry divide the two races, but language does as well. Atticus then takes Scout and the other children home.

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To Kill A Mockingbird: Chapter 13 Summary

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

When the children return home, they find Aunt Alexandra waiting for them. Adding to Scout's summer despair, Atticus is often absent from home because he is part of the state legislature, which has been called into session. Scout is fairly oblivious to issues of race so, in her mind, the Ewells are incredibly low-class, so she can't understand how their word holds any merit. Once in her room, Scout begins walking in the dark to turn on the light. The Tom Robinson case is affecting everyone, especially the Finches, as they deal with hatred and anger towards Atticus's involvement. Though Dill wants to keep his presence secret, Jem tells Atticus.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

chapter 13 summary of to kill a mockingbird

Dill sneaks into Scout's room later that night because he is still mad at Jem for telling Atticus of his arrival. She tells Scout to stop scratching her head. Atticus feeds Dill, but tells him that he needs to contact his Aunt Rachel. Defiant of her aunt, Scout turns to her and says, 'I didn't ask you! Scout knew she had gotten her father back! Jem said that yes he did and explained that Atticus had told him that Joshua S. Here, the reader gets its first look at the black community in Maycomb. While Scout is still somewhat naive regarding the words and feelings of the townspeople toward the Finches, Jem is beginning to understand the racial divide in Maycomb. The church is simple and very poor; however, the people are kind to Scout and Jem and, even though they have little, they rally to support Tom Robinson's wife.

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